Hopfield Networks addendum: Brain-State-in-a-Box model

The Brain-State-in-a-Box is neural model proposed by Anderson, Silverstein, Ritz and Jones in 1977, that presents very strong analogies with Hopfield networks (read the previous post about them). The structure of the network is similar: recurrent, fully-connected with symmetric weights and non-null auto-recurrent connections. All neurons are bipolar (-1 and…

Artificial Intelligence is a matter of Language

“The limits of my language means the limits of my world.” (L. Wittgenstein)   When Jacques Lacan proposed his psychoanalytical theory based on the influence of language on human beings, many auditors remained initially astonished. Is language an actual limitation? In the popular culture, it isn’t. It cannot be! But,…

Hodgkin-Huxley spiking neuron model in Python

The Hodgkin-Huxley model (published on 1952 in The Journal of Physiology [1]) is the most famous spiking neuron model (also if there are simpler alternatives like the “Integrate-and-fire” model which performs quite well). It’s made up of a system of four ordinary differential equations that can be easily integrated using several…

Social connection strategies

I’ve read several articles about a good way to enlarge one’s own network inside LinkedIn or other social networking tools: it could be a rather “simple” task given the number of involved users, however a bit of strategy may prevent some common mistakes that can penalize this brand new kind of “gold…

The starfish and the spider: book review

It is certainly a great book (this is the Amazon link), however, in my opinion, there’s still an important difference between two main kinds of decentralised organisations that should be defined in a more accurate way: structures like Wikipedia have a clear, well defined and global goal (for example, creating…

Web 2.0: A “Sociological” Point of View

A Web 2.0 “Sociological” point of view is probably the most interesting analysis, mainly because it can be really considered as the very network revolution. Web 1.0 could rely only on a kind of link: the one obtained from <a …> tags; its purpose was (and still it is) to allow the…