Category: Poetry

Update: New poem “Crowd”

I have just added a new poem titled “Crowd,” whose inspirational theme stems from observing the everyday life of an undistinguished mass of individuals who, in the grip of assimilated alienation, live their lives following a script that has never been read and understood. Link to the poem “Crowd” Note on the alienation and commodification […]

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When music courts poetry: the (un)betrothed

Is there a relationship between music and poetry? Indeed, this is a somewhat partisan question and can be answered in many ways. In principle, all art forms can be related to each other, but that is not what I would like to discuss. My question implies a condition widely verified in everyday reality: pop music […]

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Liszt and romantic progressivism fallen into vain

There’s no denying it: Romantic composers never cease to amaze us with their modernity, so much for the unchanging persistence of music composed before a specific historical period (a fixed idea of many music lovers and conductors today). For example, Franz Liszt (1811 – 1886), in addition to his religious vows, had also embraced social, […]

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Update: New poem “I want to dream of a Sleeping Reality”

I have just added a new poem titled “I Want to Dream of a Sleeping Reality,” the common thread of which is a deep desire to overcome the rigidity of superstructures imposed by man in his search for a “supreme rule.” It is the rhapsodic expression of a cry of despair: reality must not bend […]

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Twilight of the gods: why pop music is so darn corny

Back to the Future Part I Imagine taking a trip back in time, 200 years, to be precise, and moving to Berlin. With a bit of patience, suppose you walk unseen into the studio of Felix Mendelssohn (1809 – 1847), whose eclecticism ranged from composing music, conducting, painting, and, not least, administering a concert hall. […]

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Update: New poetic prose: “Bacchus, Tobacco, and Venus: over the centuries faithful”

I have added a new poetic prose entitled “Bacchus, Tobacco, and Venus: over the centuries faithful.” It is a tribute to pleasure, to life, and in defense of all those activities that the most boorish moralism tends to stigmatize and relegate to the “cellar of vices.” Bacchus, Tobacco, and Venus: over the centuries faithful Enter […]

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Update: New poetic prose “A Clock Ticks”

I have just added a new poetic prose entitled “A Clock Ticks.” It is a kind of elegy related to the inner observation of the periodic movement of a mechanical clock. Along with the gears, various natural elements also show their periodic oscillation between two poles that, although in opposition, eventually merge into a unity […]

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Poetic punctuation: music and Ungaretti’s hermeticism

“It is my heart the most torn country.” (G. Ungaretti) Why is it unimaginable to have music without time indications (time statement, note duration, pauses, etc.)? Even the most bizarre avant-gardes and experiments have always (and rightly, I would say) used all that information necessary to determine the rhythm, dynamics, and sometimes even the timbre […]

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Montale’s squaring word

A formless soul, devoid of regularity, incapable of adapting to the rigid boundaries that quadrature imposes is what Eugenio Montale (1896 – 1981), in the incipit of his celebrated collection “Cuttlefish Bones” (many poems are contained in “The Collected Poems of Eugenio Montale“), considers as its most intimate and unalterable essence. Don’t ask us the […]

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